Happy Birthday, Herr Mozart!

Today is W.A. Mozart’s 258th birthday!

What Mozart said here speaks volumes to what kind of master musician Mozart was:

It is a mistake to think that the practice of my art has become easy to me. I assure you, dear friend, no one has given so much care to the study of composition as I. There is scarcely a famous master in music whose works I have not frequently and diligently studied.  – W. A. Mozart. Mozart: The Man and the Artist, as Revealed in His Own Words

What’s a birthday celebration without music?

Here’s a great video of Mozart Piano Concerto No. 20 D minor, K. 466 with the Camerata Salzburg, directed by Mitsuko Uchida. Ms. Uchida, an acclaimed pianist and a Grammy Award winner, is renowned for her interpretation on the music of Mozart, Schubert and Beethoven. Here, she is directing and performing as the soloist. The entire performance is brilliant!

Happy Monday!

@Doremigirl

 

For the Love of It: Sing!

I can’t hear a thing right now.

I’m standing outside of a high school auditorium during the intermission of Project Philly concert. The foyer area is filled with vibrant noise of about 500 concert attendees – they have a great reason to be excited.

One of music teachers in my PLN, @thomasjwest, had tweeted out about this group and his involvement sometime during this summer. I remember reading about its history and reasons behind this group, I wanted to attend their annual concert.

A cappella singing is brutally hard, I have to be admit. There’s very little room to hide inconsistent intonation, messy harmonic changes, or colorless dynamic levels. But a cappella singing is also wonderfully powerful as it  brings everyone’s attention to the human voice and nothing else.

The five-year old Project Philly consisted of two performing groups, Project Pewter and Project Crimson. Each ensemble had uniquely different personalities and song sets. But they shared one prominent interest: SINGING.

I know, it sounds ridiculously obvious – or is it?

Other than in popular collegiate circles, it isn’t everyday that one sees a handful of young people get together to sing. This is how Project Philly got its start: 17 singers – 17 people who missed a cappella singing – got together, making their own song arrangements, running the rehearsals, and volunteering their houses (or their parents’ since many of them look like they are just out of high school!) for weekly rehearsals. Five years later, this group has grown into membership of 75.

WOW.

This got me thinking. Just like how my neighbor makes time to play in a community flag football team a few times a week, or like some ladies getting together to scrapbook monthly, these young people get together for the sheer love of singing. Songs are a part of who they are. Singing is who they are.

I briefly said hi to @thomasjwest and found out that most of these singers have sung in high schools or colleges and just missed singing so much. I am so glad that they had such great experiences in their youth that left them wanting more.

I really enjoyed the concert. The ensembles made good connection with the audience and the music. A few  arrangements were just too difficult for the group and their sound suffered because of it. But these are quickly forgotten by other songs that captivated us with beautiful balance of sounds – sounds that made us wish we were singing with them. The concert was about good music, good singing, and sharing a passion for building communities through music. One of my favorite song arrangements was Michale Jackson’s Rock with You. Great job, @tomjwest for a fun arrangement! Project Pewter sounded really good!

Music teacher in me couldn’t help, but think about the teachers/directors who instilled a love of singing in these singers. Whoever it was from their elementary, middle, or high schools, has helped them to find their passion. Gave me a lot to think about.

Check out their site. If you’re a local to Philly, come out to their concert next year. Project Philly connects well with its community by raising funds for arts scholarship and partnering with Philabundance (local food bank). After hearing them and learning about them, you just might end up singing with them.

I want to thank Philly Project for its passion and love for music and for their willingness to share it with us.

Wouldn’t it be great for my students to grow up and take up a hobby like this?

~ Yoon

You might also be interested to read:

Tom West’s blog entry: The A Capella Project Philadelphia: A Love Story